Factually Wrong: Congressional Healthcare vs. Obamacare

There are two issues with this meme:

  1. Members of Congress working only 28 hours a week. This might be true if you only count the times they are on Capitol Hill “officially” working. But their job is to make decisions and negotiate. As such, a lot of their job is informal information gathering and talking to other people. That seems to take 60-70 hours a week of work.
  2. “Deny” implies that they forbid healthcare. That is incorrect. Employees would still be able to negotiate a deal that includes health insurance. What they’re trying to do is permit employers to employ people 30-39 hours a week without providing health insurance or being fined for not providing it.

    This will have several different effects, which will probably benefit some people and hurt others:

    1. Some employees who were working 30-39 hours a week would lose their employer-provided health coverage and will have to buy health insurance on the exchanges mandated by the law.
    2. Some employees who were working less than 30 hours a week would get more hours (up to 39) because they are more productive and worth employing for more as long as government mandated health insurance isn’t part of the cost. This also means that some people who were juggling two jobs will be able to survive with just one.
    3. Some of the co-workers of the employees in group B will have their hours cut or lose their jobs completely, because they were only hired to fill the gap left because their more productive co-workers worked less than 30 hours a week. Roughly speaking, for every three employees in group B that get an extra ten hours/week, one group C employee gets cut.
    4. With a lower cost to employ people, overall the total number of hours worked would probably increase. This could cause a ripple effect that helps the economy in general.

h/t Arbogast Holmskragga

Evil Wal-Mart and Good Target

This produces the impression of an evil plot by Wal-Mart to turn an employee benefit into a profit center. But when Target and Trader Joe made a similar decision, it was considered a boon to workers ( http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2014/10/walmart-and-the-end-of-employer-based-health-care/381199/ ), because they can only get government subsidies if they don’t get employer-provided insurance.

h/t Lloyd A Behm II